Friday, February 7, 2020

WIRTW #586 (the “silos” edition)


Yesterday, Suzanne Lucas (aka the Evil HR Lady), asked a question about corporate jargon.

One of my least favorite corporate jargon-isms? “Stay in your lane.” It suggests that we only do that which we do best, and not veer into areas outside of our comfort zone.

Why not? New and different lead to learning and creativity.

Comfort zones are boring. They can lead to staleness and silos.

I dislike feeling siloed, in business and in life.

Case in point? Early last Sunday morning, in the tired exuberance of watching my daughter and her band tear up the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame stage the night before, I posted the following on LinkedIn:


The post garnered way more of a response than I expect, and all of it positive, with one glaring exception.


“Save it for Facebook, thanks.”

His comment really got under my skin. First, why bother taking the time to post something negative if you then choose not to engage further. Secondly, and more fundamentally, why is it inappropriate to share exciting family news on LinkedIn. Are we that siloed on social media that Facebook is only for personal news and LinkedIn is only for business news? If being a proud #girldad is an important part of who I am as a person, then why shouldn’t people who want to connect with me on a business-related platform know that about me?

What do you think? Is LinkedIn an appropriate forum to share personal information? Or did I veer too far off course by sharing my daughter’s and her band’s big win? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

As for Fake ID, you can see them at the Final Exam of the Tri-C High School Rock Off, on February 29 at the Rock Hall. Tickets are $12, include museum admission, and are available online from the Rock Hall box office (or until they sell out on the night of the event).

Here’s what I read this week:

Discrimination

HR & Employee Relations

Technology

Wage & Hour

Labor

OSHA & Safety

* Image by Clker-Free-Vector-Images from Pixabay
Real Time Web Analytics